Meditation

07/23/2020

And quarreling arose between Abram’s herdsmen and he herdsmen of Lot. The Canaanites and Perizzites were also living in the land at at time. So Abram said to Lot, ‘Let’s not have any quarreling between you and me, or between your herdsmen and mine, for we are brothers. Is not the whole land before you? Let’s part company. If you go to the left, I’ll go to the right; if you go to the right, I’ll go to the left.’ Lot looked up and saw that the whole plain of the Jordan was well watered, like the garden of the Lord, like the land of Egypt, toward Zoar. (This was before the Lord destroyed Sodom and Gomorrah). So, Lot chose for himself the whole plain of the Jordan and set out toward the east. The two men parted company. Abram lived in the land of Canaan, while Lot lived among the cities of the plain and pitched his tents near Sodom.” (Genesis 13:712)

War and conflict are as ancient as humanity. For ages, people have acted upon the conciliatory impulses of God to seek peace. The distribution of goods and wealth is a major area of dispute leading to conflict. The willingness to compromise even to the extent of giving up economic advantages often leads to peace.

Biblical history is concerned with the spiritual experiences of chosen people with God rather than with the political history of powerful nations. God’s purposes do international institutions and personalities receive notice in biblical history. Abram moved from Mesopotamia through Canaan to Egypt, but no kings, pharaohs or international events were named. Rather Abram’s ability to bring blessing or cursing on nations and individuals is the focus. History is the story of God’s blessings and promise.

PRAYER FOR THE DAY:

Precious Abba, we see that though Abram and Lot would argue, they were both not going to let events or situations separate them from their relationship as brothers. Thus, they agree to separate, and where one would go one way, the other brother would go in the opposite direction. Thus, there relationship as brothers was saved. We pray for these brothers and their families, and for all that moved on and survived the great judgment of God on the communities of Sodom and Gomorrah. We pray for all peoples who may at times argue among themselves, but stop short of hurting the relationships of family members. In Jesus’ name pray. Amen

THOUGHT OF THE DAY:

Only a living Savior can rescue a dying world.

KNOWING GOD:

In the 12 year of Ahaz king of Judah, Hoshea son of Elah became kin of Israel in Samaria, and he reigned nine year. He did evil in the eyes of the Lord, but not like the kings of Israel who preceded him. Shalmaneser king o Assyria came up to attack Hoshea, who had been Shalmaneser’s vassal and had paid him tribute. But the king of Assyria discovered that Hoshea was a traitor, for he had sent envoys to So king of Egypt, and he no longer paid tribute to the king of Assyria, as he had done year by ear. Therefore Shalmaneser seized him and put him in prison. The king of Assyria invaded the entire land, marched against Samaria and deported the Israelites to Assyria. He settled them in Halah, in Gozan on the Habor River and in the towns of the Medes. (2nd Kings 17:16)

The account of the very last king of Israel reveals the ultimate consequences of a nation failing to follow its ethical vision. God’s power had not failed, but the power on behalf of righteousness was stymied because of the hardheartedness of the Hebrews. A lesson to be learned is that no one and no nations ever rises above the possibility of judgment from God.

I AM:

Look upon Zion the city of our festivals; your eyes will see Jerusalem, a peaceful abode, a tent that will not be moved; its stakes will never be pulled up, nor nay of its ropes broken. There the Lord will be our Mighty One. It will be like a place of broad rivers and streams. No galley with oars will ride them, no mighty ship will sail them. For the Lord is our Judge, the Lord is our lawgiver, the Lord is our king; it is he who will save us. Your rigging hangs loose: The mast is not held secure, the sail is not spread. Then an abundance of spoils will be divided and even the lame will carry off plunder. No one living in Zion will say, ‘I am ill’; and the sins of those who dwell there will be forgiven.” (Isaiah33:20-24)

God’s vision for his people looks to peace under God’s rule and protection. Material prosperity, help for the sick and handicapped, and forgiveness of sins are all included in peace.

Second Thought of the Day:

When Jesus’ followers saw what was going to happen, they said, ‘Lord, should we strike with our swords?’ And one of them struck the servant of the high priest, cutting off his right ear. But Jesus answered, ‘No more of this!’ And he touched the man’s ear and healed him. Then Jesus said to the chief priests, the officers of the temple guard, and the elders, who had come for him. ‘Am I leading a rebellion, that yo have come with swords and clubs? Every day I was with you in the temple courts and you did not lay a hand on me. But this is your hour—-when darkness reigns.’” (Luke 22:4953)

Jesus and the Father chose to bring in and illustrate the Kingdom by the ways of peace and not of war. God had shown many times in Israel’s history He has the power and resources to win and war and rule over all human powers. In Christ He chose to call people to accept freely the life of peace as peacemakers.

No matter if you are well versed in the Old Testament or maybe a relative baby Christian, all can give you testimony regarding the power of God and how He has exercised this power in the past. This time though, was a transition to the New Covenant and it was going to be different. Jesus could easily have called upon God to take away this threat and even the cross itself, but Jesus Himself said it was for these times that He had come. Do you remember Jesus last comment in the garden? “But this is your hour—-when darkness reigns.” This was not a time of pride, for those seeking Jesus’ death on the cross was at hand and it was in the hands of humanity. Think about it.

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